Category Archives: Dessert Wine

Terravista Fandango 2011

Terravista Fandango 2011

BC, $25
If I’m being painfully honest here, this week’s wine is exactly the type of wine that I’d normally breeze by—it’s a $25 Okanagan white with a “playful”label and a “fun” name. But there are a few reasons
I didn’t.

Firstly, my pal Kurtis Kolt said it was good. Secondly the varietals used—Albarino and Verdejo—are two of my faves from Spain and not only are they rarely grown in BC as far as I know, they’re rarely blended together—not just here, but anywhere in the world. Google “Albarino Verdejo blend“ and this wine is the only one that comes up. Thirdly, the wine comes from Senka and Bob Tenant, the duo who founded Black Hills winery back in the day and made Note Bene into what was once upon a time the West’s first cult wine. And I am much the richer for having tried it.

The wine addresses the number one complaint many have about albarino—it’s bracing acidity—by pairing it with the softer more fruit driven verdejo and the result is a wine that still retains a balance that skews towards food but can also stand alone as aperitif. A welcome break from the Okanagan’s endless march of Pinot Gris.

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Chapoutier Banyuls 2007

Chapoutier Banyuls 2007
France, $30

Chapoutier’s stellar list of wines is among the best in France with the prestige bottlings fetching prices well into the hundreds. So why is it their excellent desert wine from the Pyrenees such bargain? It’s because the market for desert wines is as soft as vicuna. But in tragedy lies opportunity – for you to buy and drink this wonderful grenache that’s not too sweet but has a great raisin, spice and plum profile.

Château Bastor-Lamontange 2007

Château Bastor-Lamontange 2007
France, $25 +692715
Sauternes has been on the ropes lately as tastes move away from sweeter dessert-style wines, which means what was once rarified is now accessible. Take this half bottle by Bastor-Lamontagne, an excellent smaller label. It’s full of blood orange, lychee and apricot flavours but not cloyingly so. Serving it with the last course shows that the meal is an occasion and drizzling a few ounces on a roasting ham might be a nice trick as well.